One Company In Texas

Beginning August 1 2013 Mutual of Omaha will no longer sell Medigap/Medicare Supplement insurance plans in the State of Texas under the Mutual Of Omaha Brand. Instead all Medigap/Medicare Supplement plans will be offered by Mutual Of Omaha affiliate “Omaha Insurance Company”.

Anyone with a Mutual Of Omaha Medigap/Medicare Supplement plan will still be able to keep in and Mutual Of Omaha will continue servicing and paying your claims. Beginning August 1,2013 agents and brokers will no longer be able to offer for sale the Mutual Of Omaha branded plans.

If you have any questions or know of anyone who has a Mutual Of Omaha Medigap/Medicare Supplement policy with questions just call me at 1.855.664.2771 and I’ll be glad to help by answering any questions you may have.

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Final birth control rule issued for faith groups

By Kathryn Mayer | June 28, 2013

The Obama administration issued final rules Friday for the birth control mandate under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, an area of the massive health overhaul that generated some of the greatest opposition.

The mandate — effective Aug. 1, 2012 — requires most employers to cover a range of birth-control methods in their health plans without charging a co-pay or a deductible.

Religious groups have strongly opposed the rule, and dozens of lawsuits against the federal government followed. Meanwhile, the administration — as well as women’s rights advocates — continued to praise the contraception mandate, saying it gives women control over their health care.

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said Friday the final rules “strike the appropriate balance” between respecting those religious considerations and increasing access to important preventive services for women.

Related story: White House Backs Down on Birth Control

“The health care law guarantees millions of women access to recommended preventive services at no cost,” Sebelius said in a statement.

“Today’s announcement reinforces our commitment to respect the concerns of houses of worship and other nonprofit religious organizations that object to contraceptive coverage, while helping to ensure that women get the care they need, regardless of where they work.”

The final rules finalize the proposed simpler definition of “religious employer” for purposes of the exemption from the contraceptive coverage requirement in response to concerns raised by some religious organizations.

These employers, primarily churches, may exclude contraceptive coverage from their health plans for their employees and their dependents.

Women at nonprofit, religious-based organizations — such as at certain hospitals and universities — will have the ability to receive contraception through separate health policies at no cost.

The approach taken in the final rules is similar but simpler than that taken in the proposed rules, and addresses many stakeholder concerns, HHS said.

Announced early last year, the original mandate required most employers, including religious-affiliated organizations, to cover a range of birth control methods.

That triggered a fast and intense pushback from Catholics and other religious groups that oppose birth control, and called the mandate an attack on their religious freedom.

In February, the administration proposed a work-around for religious nonprofits that object to providing health insurance that covers birth control, attempting to create a barrier between religious groups and contraception coverage, through insurers or a third party.

But groups such as the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops continued to oppose the regulations.

Proponents of the mandate argue that the requirement is a “win” for women, and will help reduce unplanned pregnancies and abortions.

“The magic combination of responsible public and private policies and responsible behavior on the part of men and women can make all the difference in helping reduce unplanned pregnancy and improving the education and employment prospects of women and their families,” Sarah Brown, CEO of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, said last year.

The Catholic Church has yet to respond to the final rules.

See also:

On the Third Hand: Birth control
Birth Control Mandate Hits Groups That Backed PPACA

The cost of critical illness would probably crush your finances

By:Bill Coffin of Life Health Pro
May 7,2013

An overwhelming majority (90%) of middle-income Americans say they are not financially prepared for a critical illness diagnosis, according to a new study released by Washington National Institute for Wellness Solutions (IWS).

The study, Middle-Income America’s Perspectives on Critical Illness and Financial Security, which surveyed 1,001 Americans ages 30 to 66 with an annual household income of between $35,000 and $99,999, found that only one in 10 feels strongly confident they have enough savings to cover family emergencies and handle the financial implications of a critical illness,such as cancer, heart disease stroke, or Alzheimer’s disease.

If diagnosed with a critical illness, most middle-income Americans say they would be forced to draw on savings to pay for out-of-pocket expenses not covered by insurance. But according to the study, many have little, if any, savings to fall back on:

75% have less than $20,000 in savings
50% have less than $2,000 in savings
25% have no current savings
To pay for critical illness costs, middle-income Americans say they would need to use credit cards (28%) or loans from family/friends (23%) or financial institutions (19%) to offset expenses not covered by health insurance. Another one-fourth (23%) say they simply “don’t know” what resources they would use to help offset their expenses. Millennials and Gen Xers anticipate greater reliance on credit cards and loans to pay for critical illness expenses.

Thirty-eight percent of respondents said they would probably never recover financially from a cancer diagnosis. Forty-five percent said that they would not recover financially from an Alzheimer’s/dementia diagnosis.

Despite this, only 12 percent of respondents said they have explored care-giving options. Sixty percent have not discussed financial planning for critical illness. And eighty-eight percent have not broached the topic with loved ones or a financial advisor.